Ibogaine Detox and Treatment

Ibogaine Detox and Treatment drug rehabilitation and alcohol rehabilitation

Since the 1960s, many addicts have reported that even a single dose of ibogaine, a hallucinogenic alkaloid extracted from the root of an African shrub, helps them kick their habit by reducing their cravings for drugs. There is hard evidence to back these claims, as well.


Ibogaine was first introduced as a potential treatment for opiate addiction by Howard Lotsof, who took the drug in 1962 looking for a psychedelic experience, and awoke 30 hours later with no cravings and no withdrawal symptoms, despite being a heavy heroin user at the time. Lotsof was able to develop and follow an ibogaine maintenance program, which he then followed for three years while remaining opiate free. In 1986, Lotsof opened a company by the name of NDA International to advocate for the use and research of ibogaine and its active constituents as anti-addictive compounds.


Since ibogaine aides in the cessation of addiction, it started to be used to deal with opiates and other substance addictions. Ibogaine has only been introduced to Western scientific medicine but has documented use by the Bwiti tribe in Central Africa for centuries. At lower doses ibogaine has the ability to increase energy and mental alertness and appears to decrease the desire for food and drink. Higher doses of ibogaine (20+ mg/kg) has a larger psychoactive property, and is used ritualistically in initiation rites for its potent hallucinogenic properties.


Barbara E. Judd, CSW did a study on ibogaine and stated that the most difficult aspects of treatment are getting the patient to enter treatment. She notes that the three major obstacles are the fear of detoxification lack of insight, and the inability of patients to control their urges to use drugs. It was in these three areas where she felt the benefits of ibogaine treatment far outweighed those of traditional methods. Judd further states that psychological fear of pain and withdrawal prevents many addicts from even attempting detox. Addicts feared having to deal with the emotions that lead them to use in the first place. Judd adds that when patients learn the benefits of ibogaine they are more willing to try it.


Like all forms of detox, ibogaine is not without risks and side effects. At therapeutic doses, ibogaine has an active window of 24 to 48 hours; it is often physically and mentally exhausting and produces ataxia for as long as twelve hours. Nausea that may lead to vomiting is not uncommon throughout the experience. These side effects reduce the attractiveness of ibogaine as a recreational drug at therapeutic doses, however; at lower doses ibogaine is known to have stimulant effects. It is still a controversial and experimental drug and there are some cases of fatal cardiac arrhythmias.


There are two types of ibogaine treatment. The first type of treatment is oriented toward addiction, most commonly heroin dependence, and typically involves dosages in the range of 15 to 25 mg/ kg .5-8


The second type of treatment, also known as “initiatory," involves a dosage on the order of 8 to 12 mg/kg, or about half of the dose used for addiction and is used for spiritual insight and facilitating psychotherapy. In addition to reducing craving, ibogaine often promotes a sense of wellbeing that can last from weeks to months.


As the studies into the nature of ibogaine progress, scientists have discovered that ibogaine's anti-additive properties are actually two-fold. First, when the substance is consumed, the body produces a chemical called noribogaine. Noribogaine blocks the brain's receptors that control cravings. Noribogaine also increases dopamine and serotonin levels, which elevate feelings of wellbeing.


So while ibogaine is not a substitute for drugs, and is not addictive, ibogaine is a chemical dependence disruption and a chance for patients to get a head start on recovery. Ibogaine enables the patient to focus on the underlying causes of addiction without going through the intense withdrawal symptoms that accompany most types of detoxification. Even if there are some remaining symptoms after ibogaine detox they are more tolerable than other detox approaches.


Thirteen studies show that ibogaine has the ability to drastically attenuate drug withdrawal in all patients. Ninety percent of treated patients during one case study showed ibogaine continued to interrupt the patient's craving for continued drug use for periods of time ranging from as short as two days to as long as two and a half years from a single treatment.



References

  1. Holmes, Bob. African herb yields its anti-addiction secret. New Scientist magazine, issue 2483, 22 January 2005
  2. De Rienzo, Paul, Dana Beal and Members of the Project. (1997). The Ibogaine Story. Autonomedia Publications, 1997.
  3. Mash, Deborah C, et al. (2000). Ibogaine: Complex Pharmacokinetics, Concerns for Safety, and Preliminary Efficacy Measures. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 914, 394-401.
  4. Judd, Barbara S. Ibogaine, psychotherapy, and the treatment of substance-related disorders. Presented at The Eighth International Conference on Drug Related Harm Washington, DC, 19 November1994.
  5. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ibogaine. Ibogaine: Side Effects.
  6. Alper, K.R., H.S. Lotsof, G.M.N. Frenken, D.J. Luciano, and J. Bastiaans, Am. J. Addict. 1999: 8, 234.
  7. Mash, Deborah C., Craig A. Kovera, Billy E. Buck, Michael D. Norenberg, Paul Shapshak, W. Lee Hearn, and Juan Sanchez-Ramos. Medication development of ibogaine as a pharmacotherapy for drug dependence. Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci. 1998:844, 274.
  8. Lotsof, H.S. Multidiscip. Assoc. Psyched. Stud. Bull. 1995:5, 16.
  9. Naranjo, C. Clin. Toxicol. 1969:2, 209.
  10. Naranjo, C. The Healing Journey, New York: Pantheon Books, 1973.
  11. Stolaroff, M.J. The Secret Chief, Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), Charlotte, NC, 1997.
  12. Huxley, A. The Doors of Perception, New York: Harper, 1954.
  13. http://detoxnaturally.com The Ibogaine Association, Why choose ibogaine for detox drug?

Topic Discussion

  1. Addict

    My girlfriend has been experiencing psychedelic colors for several weeks now after being exposed to something by a burglar who entered her home. The perpetrator appeared to be Black or brown, and since Ibogaine comes from Africa, I think it may be this she was exposed to. How does one detox from Ibogaine?

  2. Addict

    Are you serious!? If this is true it is very unfortunate. I can't believe how racist this comment is. The perpetrator is black and ibogaine is from Africa? Africa is a very large continent. With many countries. Ibogaine is very rare. It is almost impossible this really occurred.

  3. Addict

    How or where can i seek treatment for Ibogaine? I have used very strong medicine to deal with chronic pain. I'm trying to come to term with the pain, but when all is said and done the need for the "medicine" is still there. I am hoping to use Ibogaine treatment to get the poison in my system out for good. I need the help of an advocate who is knowledgeable, professional, and compassionate to help guide me through this process.

    • Addict

      If you get a responce, PLEASE Forward it to me. I am soooooooo tired of this life style.

      Blessed Be

  4. Addict

    I have heard in the U.S. it is not legal? IF IT WORKS for us why would it not be legal here in the US? I do not have the funds to travel to the other side of the world. I could however get to Canada. If anyone has any further information please post or e-mail the results. I am 56 and would rather not go on Methadone, just exchanging one for another. I want this and I am worth a real life.

    Blessed Be

    • Addict

      Well the US makes all kinds of money off of its preferred method of keeping addiction going by selling methadone, Suboxone...ect They replace mood altering life destroying drugs for other life controlling drugs and it's a big business for them. Same way many "Alcohol Free States" Have their own liquor Store State owned stores.....It's all about the money anymore no one has time or compassion for the hopeless addict.

  5. Addict

    I am looking for treatment with iBogaine in the US as well. I'm a disabled Vet and I can't travel around the world with 5 kids at home. I so want to get off of oxycodone that has ruined my life.

    Thank you
    Jim

  6. Addict

    I am a disabled vet looking for I begoine treatment in the US. I hit 5 kids and can't afford to travel around the world for treatment. Does anybody know any place in the US where you can get treatment hopefully Colorado.

  7. Addict

    Looking for ibgoine treatment in the US.

    • Addict

      There is no treatment center in the good ol US. I recently underwent treatment to detox from opiates and Zoloft. I cannot tell you how much it has changed my life. I had been prescribed these medications for approx. 10 years. When I consulted my physician regarding my issues, fatigue, dependence, etc.. He wanted to send me to a therapist which would have prescribed me some Adderall, Ritalin. I refused and attempted to withdrawal myself for the last year it was an up and down battle and never ending constant physical dependence that I could have just died. Until I came across Ibogaine. I did all my research and found a clinic. At this point I was really scared of what would happen to me if I did not go through it. My career, family, my health, sanity.

      At this point I have been off everything for 6 weeks and I have never felt better.

      • Addict

        Where did you go to get Ibogaine treatment? I have been saving for months to be able to get off all this poison. Where was the clinic? And if you don't mind me asking, how much did it cost, how many treatments did you get, and how long were you there?

  8. Addict

    The United States should legalize this! Yet they choose profits over the well-being of their people! They want us weak and dependent! Not too long before all that greed makes us a 3rd world country!

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